How to stay healthy, and maybe find a career, in the age of biotech

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USC partnered with Univision for community health fair at East LA Community College. Some of 3500 people attended.

It was a honor to be part of this event. With everybody´s effort, we made a positive impact on our community.

Doctor’s orders: How to stay healthy, and maybe find a career, in the age of biotech

Get regular checkups, keep in touch with your doctor and be aware of opportunities in biotech. Those are doctor’s orders from Rene Sotelo, professor of clinical urology at Keck School of Medicine of USC, who spoke with community members and families during a health fair Saturday at East Los Angeles College.

“Take care of yourself,” said Sotelo, a pioneer in urinary robotic surgery, as he answered questions in Spanish about cancer screening and treatment from residents of Boyle Heights and other nearby communities. Sotelo also emphasized the educational and career prospects in medicine and biotech.

“There are many career opportunities for students, involving technology that will assist them to improve the quality of health care. This includes apps, medical devices, pharmaceuticals,” Sotelo said. “There’s technology that can help us follow the patient home after the surgery to see exactly how they’re doing. All this is part of it, and there are no barriers.”

Ghecemy Lopez, a cancer information resource and navigation specialist with the Keck School, took the stage along with Sotelo. She focused on engaging and educating youths about in the importance of creativity and critical thinking in STEM, cancer research and patient advocacy.

Lopez said that STEM education — focusing on science, technology, engineering and math — is an equalizer of economic and labor opportunities that can address health issues and break barriers, particularly those affecting the immigrant and low income community in Los Angeles. Lopez, who survived cancer at a young age, said she is grateful that STEM technology and research advances helped her beat cancer and gave her a second chance in life.

More at: News.usc.edu